About Us

About ‘Land and Energy Sustainable Systems’

LESS Means More is a family consultancy incorporated in Brussels comprising two partners, Paulo Casaca and his daughter Madalena Casaca. Formed in 2010, based on the main partner’s experience  and aiming at providing consultancy on sustainable projects, it has mostly worked in cooperation with the humanitarian association ARCHumankind and the think tank South Asia Democratic Forum.

Our civilization is confronted with the challenge of attaining ever higher development levels , giving everyone the opportunity to enjoy life opportunities and accomplishments and yet preserving our planet, respecting our environment and better managing natural resources.

In short, we are obliged to use fewer resources while extending access to ever more goods and services with an ever-increasing quality to more and more people.

Within these guidelines Paulo Casaca has authored two conceptual papers on integrated development:

Ten years after the official launching of the United Nations Global Compact, the International Standard Organisation (ISO) working group on Social Responsibility completed discussions on a new norm regarding said social responsibility, the ISO 26000 2010, which considerably deepens and complements the UN initiative.

The draft was approved on 14 September, 2010; this is the first of a set of fourth-generation ISO norms. While the first generation dealt with specifications on products, the second with rules for the production of these products and the third with the management systems of production, we are now dealing with guidelines rather than norms concerning attitudes by all social actors rather than solely business organisations.

Based on a consumer associations initiative launched in 2000, the ISO 26000 was a key social development in 2010 on a global scale. The concept of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) has been around for some time, and a majority of the most well-known companies as well as a growing number of the “not so well-known” and “not so big” ones have developed CSR-related programmes. Both organisations with ongoing Social Responsibility (SR) policies and those without will have to pay attention to the coming challenge. A new, holistic, intuitive perception of the developing world’s social norms in many different domains such as human rights or biodiversity is demanded, as well as a sense of strategy to understand what must be the leading flag of the organisation and a perception of the crucial governance rules needed to face these challenges.

Parallel to the Social Responsibility precise ISO 26000 definition, there have been other initiatives such as the ‘Environmental, Social and Governance’ factors (ESG), which are used mostly for investment decisions (see here) and for the development of rating businesses in a less precise fashion and following criteria more adaptable to public opinion’s priorities.

Both the SDG goals and ESG initiatives compare poorly with ISO 26000 from the point of view of conceptual robustness, although the latter needs a global refreshment as it is already nine years old and was slow to gain acceptance.

Our civilization is confronted with the challenge of attaining ever higher development levels , giving everyone the opportunity to enjoy life opportunities and accomplishments and yet preserving our planet, respecting our environment and better managing natural resources.

In short, we are obliged to use fewer resources while extending access to ever more goods and services with an ever-increasing quality to more and more people.

Within these guidelines Paulo Casaca has authored two conceptual papers on integrated development:

Ten years after the official launching of the United Nations Global Compact, the International Standard Organisation (ISO) working group on Social Responsibility completed discussions on a new norm regarding said social responsibility, the ISO 26000 2010, which considerably deepens and complements the UN initiative.

The draft was approved on 14 September, 2010; this is the first of a set of fourth-generation ISO norms. While the first generation dealt with specifications on products, the second with rules for the production of these products and the third with the management systems of production, we are now dealing with guidelines rather than norms concerning attitudes by all social actors rather than solely business organisations.

Based on a consumer associations initiative launched in 2000, the ISO 26000 was a key social development in 2010 on a global scale. The concept of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) has been around for some time, and a majority of the most well-known companies as well as a growing number of the “not so well-known” and “not so big” ones have developed CSR-related programmes. Both organisations with ongoing Social Responsibility (SR) policies and those without will have to pay attention to the coming challenge. A new, holistic, intuitive perception of the developing world’s social norms in many different domains such as human rights or biodiversity is demanded, as well as a sense of strategy to understand what must be the leading flag of the organisation and a perception of the crucial governance rules needed to face these challenges.

Parallel to the Social Responsibility precise ISO 26000 definition, there have been other initiatives such as the ‘Environmental, Social and Governance’ factors (ESG), which are used mostly for investment decisions (see here) and for the development of rating businesses in a less precise fashion and following criteria more adaptable to public opinion’s priorities.

Both the SDG goals and ESG initiatives compare poorly with ISO 26000 from the point of view of conceptual robustness, although the latter needs a global refreshment as it is already nine years old and was slow to gain acceptance.